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Ozone Depletion: Ozone Layer, Chlorodifluoromethane, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Clams, Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion Books LLC

Ozone Depletion: Ozone Layer, Chlorodifluoromethane, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Clams, Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion

Books LLC

Published August 15th 2011
ISBN : 9781157641322
Paperback
30 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Ozone layer, Chlorodifluoromethane, Dichlorodifluoromethane, CLaMS, Scientific Assessment of OzoneMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Ozone layer, Chlorodifluoromethane, Dichlorodifluoromethane, CLaMS, Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion, Polar stratospheric cloud, MOZART, Ozone layer formation, Bromochloromethane, Bromodifluoromethane, Ozone-oxygen cycle, Dibromodifluoromethane, Chloropentafluoroethane, Ozone depletion potential, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Tropospheric ozone depletion events, Dibromofluoromethane, Equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine, Vienna Conference. Excerpt: Ozone depletion describes two distinct but related phenomena observed since the late 1970s: a steady decline of about 4% per decade in the total volume of ozone in Earths stratosphere (the ozone layer), and a much larger springtime decrease in stratospheric ozone over Earths polar regions. The latter phenomenon is referred to as the ozone hole. In addition to these well-known stratospheric phenomena, there are also springtime polar tropospheric ozone depletion events. The details of polar ozone hole formation differ from that of mid-latitude thinning, but the most important process in both is catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic halogens. The main source of these halogen atoms in the stratosphere is photodissociation of man-made Halocarbon refrigerants (CFCs, freons, halons.) These compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface. Both types of ozone depletion were observed to increase as emissions of Halocarbons increased. CFCs and other contributory substances are referred to as ozone-depleting substances (ODS). Since the ozone layer prevents most harmful UVB wavelengths (280-315 nm) of ultraviolet light (UV light) from passing through the Earths atmosphere, observed and projected decreases in ozone have generated worldwide concern leading to adoption of the Montreal Protocol that bans the production of CFCs, h...